WHAT WE DO? WE SELL OPTIONS FOR INCOME. WE USE THAT INCOME TO BUY DIVIDEND GROWTH STOCKS!
CHECK OUR TRADES ON OUR MeWe PAGE!


Posted by MartZee December 08, 2010
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Making Personal Loans For Fun And Profit


“…banks weren’t going to get us out of this (recession) mess.”

Looking for hefty yields? Lending Club offers them by turning you into a banker to the little guy.

Lending Club was founded by Renaud Laplanche, a French native who worked as a New York securities lawyer before launching database search firm MatchPoint. Laplanche whipped out his plastic (and paid 18% annual interest) to cover the cost of computers and furniture early on. When he later related this war story to friends, some said they would have happily lent him money on less onerous terms.

The service launched in May 2007 as one of Facebook’s first applications, which attracted buzz and young borrowers with scanty credit histories to mine. Laplanche shifted gears and primed the pump with $12 million from angel investors and Silicon Valley Bank.

These days Lending Club is one of a handful of peer-to-peer lenders filling a gap created by tightfisted bankers.

Open your investing account here or
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Posted by MartZee December 02, 2010
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Portfolio monthly review – November 2010

Portfolio monthly review - November 2010

Here is a monthly review of my Trading account, Roth IRA account and Lending Club account during a bit bumpy market. In November 2010 the market was correcting which was a great opportunity to buy more shares of stocks, mutual funds or ETFs cheaper.
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Posted by MartZee November 30, 2010
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PAXHX replacing ATIPX in my ROTH IRA account


I am replacing ATIPX with a new mutual fund PAXHX in my account. I will not sell ATIPX yet, but I will not be buying this mutual fund anymore. I am “putting this fund on the shelf“. Reasons for not buying this fund anymore are:

  1. ATIPX is no longer an NTF fund, so I cannot be investing small amounts without paying a fee.
  2. ATIPX is no longer provided by my broker.
  3. PAXHX has better performance, dividend yield and distribution yield (see below).

Here is a short comparison:

Compared Funds PAXHX ATIPX
  High Yiled Bond High Yiled Bond
  NTF, No Load No Load
Expense Ratio 1.04% 1.24%
Fund Price
(11/30/2010)
$7.79 $9.26
YTD Return
(11/30/2010)
+9.72% +9.23%
Distribution Yield (TTM)
(11/30/2010)
8.25% 6.10%
Dividend Yield
(11/30/2010)
7.57% 5.61%
Portfolio Turnover 58% 155%

Based on the above data I will be now investing into PAXHX fund.

PAXHX, Barchart.com



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Posted by MartZee November 30, 2010
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GM? No thanks.


I recently found an interesting article about General Motors (GM) sometimes called Government Motors. The article described what I already think and agree on in regards to this company and the biggest thievery in recent history. All what bothers me about this real-socialism had happened with this company. Our government did a great job by providing a lesson to all who seek easy life, do not want to take care of themselves, are lazy, always rely on someone else, are jealous to those who strive and try every day. Yes folks, this is how socialism works!

Recently GM went back to markets issueing their IPO. The money generated from the IPO went straight to the government. The government has a vested interest in the company and wants their money back. So of course we are going to see an inflated IPO price that does not represent the valuation of the company.

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Posted by MartZee November 14, 2010
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Stocks That Pay Monthly Dividends


There is a reason that most mortgages are paid monthly and not quarterly. Banks are looking for reassurance the payments will continue to come in. In much the same way, many investors find comfort in owning stocks that pay monthly dividends. There are several advantages to receiving dividends each month over the traditional quarterly, semi-annual or annual dividends. Here are a few, along with some monthly dividend payers:

  • Consistent Income
  • Easier to Budget
  • Compounds Faster
  • The Monthly Dividend Company

Monthly Bond Funds

iShares Barclays 1-3 Year Credit Bond (CSJ) | Yield: 3.73%
Vanguard Short-Term Bond ETF (BSV) | Yield: 2.74%
Vanguard Intermediate-Term Bond ETF (BIV) | Yield: 4.32%
Vanguard Long-Term Bond ETF (BLV) | Yield: 5.16%

Canadian Trusts

Baytex Energy Trust (BTE) | Yield: 6.2%
Enerplus Resources Fund (ERF) | Yield: 9.4%
Pengrowth Energy Trust (PGH) | Yield: 8.5%
Penn West Energy Trust (PWE) | Yield: 8.8%
Provident Energy Trust (PVX) | Yield: 11.6%

Special Purpose Funds

Enerplus Resources Fund (ERF) | Yield: 9.4%
Eaton Vance Tax-Adv. Global Div. Oppor. Fund (ETO) | Yield: 7.7%
The Gabelli Global Utility & Income Trust (GLU) | Yield: 6.3%
Pimco Global Stocksplus Income Fund (PGP) | Yield: 10.5%
LMP Real Estate Income Fund Inc. (RIT) | Yield: 8.2%

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Posted by MartZee November 04, 2010
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My goal with Lending Club


Recently I was thinking what I want to do with my Lending Club account. Actually Rob Garcia asked me that question the other day when we had a short discussion about my plans and goals when investing with Lending Club. I answered that I wanted to invest and reinvest for upcoming next three years and then I’ll see.

I continued thinking about his question. If we are suppose to know our plans and goals prior to investing, well I definitely had no idea what I wanted to reach. Do you know the TV commercial ING Gazillion?

Well, I felt like the guy in this commercial. “So I blindly throw money in it and hope something good happens…”

It is time to think what my plan should look like. I tried to remember why I started investing with Lending Club at first. I wanted additional income which I can invest and thus increase my investing and retirement savings. When I was searching for some money making opportunities I came across Lending Club and even though it wasn’t what I was looking for at the beginning I liked the idea and opportunities so much that I decided to give it a try.

Now I am glad I did it. Currently my return is 12.47%. Where else can you get it?

So I started to think about my plans and how to fit Lending Club into the entire picture. Since I still want additional income, my goal now will be to save the same way as I am doing so far – $100 every month, reinvest all proceedings (principal and interest) as long as my expected monthly income reaches $200 after tax. Once it happens, I will split income, reinvest $100 and withdraw the other half for either spending it on my own or reinvesting into my ROTH IRA account.

Here is my goal so far:

Lending Club Goal
15%  

So far I accomplished 15% of this goal.




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Posted by MartZee October 30, 2010
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How to Manage Money?


What should you do with your hard earned cash? There are many choices we face on a daily basis that can create confusion and can point us in in a different direction at any time. There are many things that we should and shouldn’t do with regards to our finances and how to manage money. Let’s go through some of the more important ways to start saving and put your money where it belongs.
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Posted by MartZee October 30, 2010
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Portfolio monthly review – October 2010


Monthly review of my Trading account, Roth IRA account and Lending Club account
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Posted by MartZee October 23, 2010
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How Reinvesting Dividends Accelerates Yield on Cost


An article “How Yield on Cost Works” by David Van Knapp discussed the basic yet oft-misunderstood concept of yield on cost (YOC). In a nutshell, it explains why your personal yield from a dividend stock goes up as the company increases its dividends. The reason is because your personal yield is based—and always will be based—on the price you paid for the stock. That’s what the “C” in YOC stands for: Your cost. It is not affected by changes in the price of the stock after you bought it. If you make additional purchases, each new purchase has its own YOC.
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Posted by MartZee October 19, 2010
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5 Dividend Paying Stocks Experiencing Growth


Dividend yields will often fall in low interest rate environments (usually due to a slow economy) and bull markets (stock returns tend to outpace dividends.) When you combine those two factors over the last 18 months the average dividend yield available in the S&P 500 has only been lower during the stock bubble of 2000-2001. This is not a great sign for stocks over the long term but it does mean that there are a few firms who are really standing out in contrast. We should expect to see dividend yields remain low while the Fed keeps interest rates near zero.

We have listed the criteria we used to develop the search for these stocks below. You can also run the search yourself at finviz.com. Try to modify the criteria yourself to meet your specific investing style.

Here are the criteria and the stocks returned by the screener:

  • Dividend Yield
  • Optionable and Shortable
  • ROE
  • Performance

Omega Healthcare Investors (OHI: 23.15, 0.29)
Dividend Yield: 6.47%
ROE: 8.46%
Performance (YTD): 23.30%
Dividend Growth Rate 5yr Avg: 9.73%
Dividend Payout Ratio: 162.00%
Consecutive Div. Increases: 6 years
Dividends paid since: 1992

Consolidated Communications Holdings (CNSL: 18.77, 0.06)
Dividend Yield: 8.28%
ROE: 42.19%
Performance (YTD): 16.43%
Dividend Growth Rate 5yr Avg: 55.79%
Dividend Payout Ratio: 161.00%
Consecutive Div. Increases: 0 years
Dividends paid since: 2005

Alliance Holdings GP (AHGP: 44.24, -0.12)
Dividend Yield: 4.36%
ROE: 49.02%
Performance (YTD): 69.12%
Dividend Growth Rate 3yr Avg: 23.78%
Dividend Payout Ratio: 83.00%
Consecutive Div. Increases: 3 years
Dividends paid since: 2006
This stock looks like a good candidate for further review. It has a decent payout ratio (considering the sector in which the stock belongs to), good dividend yield and promising dividend growth (the stock hasn’t paid/increased the dividend long enough to review 5yr growth).

Tanger Factory Outlet Centers (SKT: 44.24, 0.09)
Dividend Yield: 3.27%
ROE: 5.06%
Performance (YTD): 25.16%
Dividend Growth Rate 5yr Avg: 3.95%
Dividend Payout Ratio: 375.00%
Consecutive Div. Increases: 16 years
Dividends paid since: 1993
The payout ratio of this stock is too high and so dividend is unsustainable. Expect dividend cut.

Frontier Communications Corporation (FTR: 8.76, 0.23)
Dividend Yield: 8.78%
ROE: 37.76%
Performance (YTD): 19.44%
Dividend Growth Rate 5yr Avg: -1.25%
Dividend Payout Ratio: 214.00%
Consecutive Div. Increases: 0 years
Dividends paid since: 2004
Frontier recently cut its dividends. The company has done a good job under CEO Mary Wilderotter of milking profit from a declining fixed-line telecom business. The company recently ratcheted back its payout as it beefs up operations recently purchased from Verizon. However, I cannot consider this stock as a secure dividend stock.

Emphasis added by the owner of this blog.
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